The Writer's Guide to Vivid Settings and Characters: An Amazing Descriptive Thesaurus on Writing Description


HOW TO CREATE EVOCATIVE SETTINGS



No matter what genre you write, fiction writers should learn how to craft descriptions like a seasoned pro. World-building isn’t easy, but creating original depictions of characters, locations, weather, and mood can greatly improve anyone’s writing. 

Evocative settings are more effective and compelling when they’re visible, auditory, olfactory, and tactile. And character descriptions are much more visual and lifelike when they have unique physical attributes.


That’s why sensory details can enhance any setting through the descriptive use of smells, colors, textures, sounds, and the sense of touch/feel. A descriptive writer can trigger in the reader any of the five senses with evocative specifics.


The Deep POV method can be used in a lot of different ways besides the obvious ones, like show emotions or just getting inside a character’s head. It can also aid in describing characters and crafting active settings through sensory details. 


Showing (Deeper POV) merely means allowing the reader to deeply experience things for themselves, through the viewpoint and perception of a character. Deep POV is just describing everything that your character is feeling, observing, and identifying, along with whatever they’re seeing, hearing, touching, and/or smelling.


Creating remarkable settings isn’t easy. Most of my critique partners and the other writers with whom I work with tend to skip including any background scenery or description to their scenes. Or the descriptions are written too blandly and shallow. But characters need to be anchored to their settings and readers need visual images to envision the world in which you’ve created. 


Author, Linda Sue Park has great advice on writing description by using the “Rule of Three.” She gives herself three sentences. That’s all. When she finds places in her novel where a character is just thinking to himself or describing something and there’s a long block of text, she knows it’s time to revise and get things moving again by tightening the narrative, which just means more white space on the page.


Often times, shallower writing occurs when a writer uses too many adverbs, clich├ęd phrases, or ineffective adjectives to describe something. When a writer “tells” the reader information about the characters or setting in a nondescript way, it weakens the descriptions. In fiction, verbs should carry the weight of the description, but using too many “ly” adverbs can deaden the writing.


If writers want to make a sentence have greater impact, then I suggest they use a Thesaurus and search for the most dramatic and powerful verbs that they can find.


Please compare these two sentences…


SHALLOW: Vaugh walked into the restaurant.
SHOWING: Vaughn sauntered into the restaurant.


Did you notice the difference between the shallow description and the showing one? Just changing one word can give the description more meaning.


While the verb “walked” is okay to use in a sentence, it’s rather flavorless. The second example shows the reader a much more clear image of Vaughn entering the room. I think the main reason that authors are often cautioned against using adverbs is that many writers overuse them when a stronger verb would work better.


Descriptive details in a setting can invoke sensory recreations of experiences for our readers. In other words, great description engages the senses and paints a more compelling image that effortlessly transports a reader into the fictional world that the author has created. Writing that lacks description is in danger of being ambiguous, or even extremely generic.


To help me write tangible settings, I have created a folder on my computer labeled Description Docs that is stuffed with files I can easily reference with descriptive phrases, words, and paragraphs. I also have files categorized under: “Description: town or city” and “Description: fog-mist-dew” and “Description: bedroom” and so forth. They come in handy as I’m drafting a novel. 


Why is setting and description so important?


The significance of adding description to your scenes means that you’re using a Deeper POV and constructing dramatic, believable settings for your characters, and your readers. 


For example, below is a short description of the heroine’s bedroom in my novel, Beautifully Broken. 


Please carefully study this excerpt…

With the lights on, my gaze took in the cluttered space: the black-painted wall behind the bed covered with random poems, song lyrics, and cutouts from magazines. 


I yawned and plopped sideways on the iron-frame bed, rumpling the pink comforter that matched the curtains and circular rug under the desk. 


***
That scene was short, yet effective, giving the reader a distinct picture of the teen girl’s bedroom in their mind.

When book reviewers use expressions like “dramatic scenes,” or “haunting imaginary,” or “vivid prose” to describe the writing, what they’re really stating is that the writer has succeeded at a Deeper POV.




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Learn to Describe a Realistic Setting with Atmospheric Detail and Create Vivid Characters!
 
No matter what genre you write, after reading this guide, fiction writers will be able to craft descriptions like a pro! World-building isn’t easy, but creating original depictions of characters, locations, weather, and mood can greatly enhance anyone’s writing. 


Evocative settings are more effective and compelling when they’re visible, auditory, olfactory, and tactile. And character descriptions are much more visual and lifelike when they have unique physical attributes.


This valuable reference and descriptive thesaurus offers writers a simplified way to depict vibrant settings and dynamic character descriptions flawlessly.
Each chapter provides specific, practical tools to help make writing descriptions and crafting three-dimensional characters simple and fun, with plenty of illustrations to highlight each point.


Author S. A. Soule shares her expertise with writers by revealing foolproof, easy methods of getting readers so emotionally invested in the story that booklovers will be flipping the pages to find out what happens next. This in-depth guidebook should be kept as a vital reference in every writer’s toolbox. 


Start reading your copy today! Click here

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