Crafting Vivid Settings and Character Descriptions - #WriteTip


http://www.amazon.com/Writers-Guide-Vivid-Settings-Characters-ebook/dp/B00F8LDYVI

If you’ve finished writing a novel or short story, then congratulations! That is a huge accomplishment to be very proud of, but now comes the revision work that will really make your story shine…

No matter what genre you write, fiction writers should learn how to craft descriptions like a seasoned pro. World-building isn’t easy, but creating original depictions of characters, locations, weather, and mood can greatly enhance anyone’s writing. 

Evocative settings are more effective and compelling when they’re visible, auditory, olfactory, and tactile. And character descriptions are much more visual and lifelike when they have unique physical attributes.


That’s why sensory details can enhance any setting through the descriptive use of smells, colors, textures, sounds, and the sense of touch/feel. A descriptive writer can trigger in the reader any of the five senses with evocative specifics.


I have recently expanded and updated my guidebook on writing description, "The Writer's Guide to Vivid Settings and Characters" which will instantly help writers create dramatic scenes. Also, it illustrates how to craft a distinct and realistic world filled with three-dimensional characters, vivid locations, and naturalistic weather. Plus, it now includes a super handy thesaurus that has word lists on ways to describe colors, weather, a character's hair and clothing, seasons, and so much more!


Throughout this guidebook, writers will learn how they can use the five senses to arouse the reader’s own senses of sight, touch, hear, smell, taste, and even feel. And I illustrate ways a writer of any genre can revise description info-dumps to establish a mood that harmonizes nicely with the novel’s storyline, and even how to craft unique descriptions of characters, locations, and climate. Plus, writers will learn how Eliminating Filter Words and Writing in Deep POV can enhance every scene.

Each chapter provides specific, practical tools to help make writing descriptions and crafting three-dimensional characters simple and fun, with plenty of illustrations to highlight each point.


The most important writing tools that I provide in the updated and expanded book are:

 
* The importance of using sensory details
* To expertly master showing vs. telling
* The impact setting can have on a story
* To effectively describe vivid characters
* How adding color and weather will strengthen description


Any fiction writer who has taken a creative writing course, or received a professional edit on their manuscript, or worked with a critique partner has undoubtedly heard these three words: show, don’t tell


In my very humble opinion, I believe that fiction is mostly about establishing a visceral, emotional connection between the character(s) and the reader. Two ways to do this is to have a strong “suspension of disbelief” within the storyline by ensuring the plot is plausible, and even more importantly, by showing instead of telling.


One of the best ways to do this is to use a Deeper POV, which in most cases creates vibrant and dramatic images within the reader’s mind that deeply immerses them in your fictional world. 


Every writer has their strengths and weaknesses. Personally, I love writing descriptions of places, buildings, characters, and objects in great detail. I have fun finding new ways to add color and realism and the five senses to most of my scenes. But the majority of writers that I’ve worked with forget to include any details regarding the setting. While I’m reading and critiquing their work, I’m not connecting to the characters or the story, if I can’t envision where a character is in a scene or their surroundings. 


Description isn’t optional in fiction. Every scene should include some details pertaining to the character’s environment. 


For instance, if a new scene starts with two characters talking, but there’s no mention where the scene takes place or where the characters are, then it leaves me with a weak visual. Writers don’t need to go into too much detail, but some is helpful in order to cement the scene and keep the characters from seeming as though they’re just floating around in space instead of being firmly anchored to the fictional world where they exist.


I believe that if you make your settings original, they’ll propel your story forward, infuse your fictional world with mood and atmosphere, and add the powerful flavor of emotion that agents/editors demand and readers enjoy.


Writers should want readers to experience the story through the senses of their characters. And by engaging the five senses, it helps readers connect more closely with the character’s experience. Shallow sentences with filter words will have the opposite effect. 


Please compare these descriptive examples…


SHALLOW: I touched the dress to feel the fabric.
SHOWING: My fingers caressed the silky fabric. 


Notice the difference between the shallow description and the more vivid “showing” one?


If you’re going to describe how something tastes, sounds and looks, then you can leave out how it feels and smells. You never want to assault your reader’s senses, or they will skip ahead to get back to the action. 


Please compare the next two examples (I have underlined what I consider to be filtering references that create narrative distance)


SHALLOW:
When Scott heard the growling sound, he looked down and saw a large dog blocking the trail. He knew it would attack if he moved. Scott felt a sense of terror build in his heart.


SHOWING:
Scott halted at the warning growl. Standing in front of him was a large dog, flashing its teeth. He stifled the girlish shriek that leaked from his lips with one hand. His heart jackhammered in his chest as he took a stumbling step backward.


In the second example, you can imagine much more vividly the dog and Scott’s emotional response.

Throughout this awesome new and improved guidebook, I’ll be discussing how writers can enhance elements of a story by incorporating a description of the locations, landscapes, and the characters in each scene. And I offer several simple techniques for creating sensory details to enhance the world-building. 


For more tools and tips on writing awesome descriptions, please check out my book!
Learn to Describe a Realistic Setting with Atmospheric Detail and Create Vivid Characters!
 
No matter what genre you write, fiction writers will learn how to craft descriptions like a seasoned pro. World-building isn’t easy, but creating original depictions of characters, locations, weather, and mood can greatly enhance anyone’s writing.

Evocative settings are more effective and compelling when they’re visible, auditory, olfactory, and tactile. And character descriptions are much more visual and lifelike when they have unique physical attributes. This valuable reference and descriptive thesaurus offers writers a simplified way to depict vibrant settings and dynamic character descriptions flawlessly.

Writers will learn:
* The importance of using sensory details
* To expertly master showing vs. telling
* The impact setting can have on a story
* To effectively describe vivid characters
* How adding color will strengthen description

Each chapter provides specific, practical tools to help make writing descriptions and crafting three-dimensional characters simple and fun, with plenty of illustrations to highlight each point.
 

S. A. Soule shares her expertise with writers by revealing foolproof, easy methods of getting readers so emotionally invested in the story that booklovers will be flipping the pages to find out what happens next. This in-depth guidebook should be kept as a vital reference in every writer’s toolbox.

Are you ready to take your writing skills to the next level?



*If you've purchased an eBook copy before April 2016 and you would like the expanded and updated edition, please email the receipt Amazon (or other online retailer) sent you to me: EMAIL. Please mention which portable reading device you own, and I will email you the eBook format suitable for that reader within 48 hours.

1 comment

  1. Guilty as charged. I even pat myself on the back for 'showing' when I write shallow descriptions.

    Lesson learnt!

    Celeste

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